Kyrie Irving’s “Uncle Drew” Stands Up for Old Basketball Players

Kyrie Irving

I play old-men’s pickup basketball with a crew that meets every Tuesday night during the winter. Our oldest members are in their 60’s and have been partaking of this weekly ritual for decades. But there are also some younger guys in their 20’s who play with us.

Of course, there is some friendly trash-talking about old men and their ability to play the game (usually coming from the old men themselves). So, when I came across this video, I immediately sent it to my crew (immediately after I stopped laughing, that is).

It shows rookie NBA sensation Kyrie Irving in an amazing makeup job that makes him look like he’s in his 60’s or 70’s. When a player in a game of playground basketball gets “hurt,” Kyrie is convinced to take his place. The opponents are a group of cocky 20-something hotshots who don’t like the idea of playing against an old man.

The results are hilarious and some of “Uncle Drew’s” moves are amazing. I’ll be trying them all next year (not!).

I don’t know how many of the people in the video were aware that it was a setup (I’m pretty sure I saw NBA great, Clyde Drexler, standing on the sidelines), but it’s funny regardless. And for you PE teachers and basketball coaches who have to listen to trash talk from your students about your declining hoops skills – well, send them this video!

Check out the video here:

P.S. This is the final blog before the summer holidays. There won’t be a blog over the summer (who’s going to read it anyway), but we’ll be back in September. Have a great summer vacation! And as you can see, we’re experimenting with a new, cleaner look for the blog. When you come back next Fall, we should have it finalized. I hope you like it.

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Dick Moss, Editor,
PE Update.com

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[tags]basketball,Kyrie Irving,masters basketball,Uncle Drew>[/tags]

The Masters Golf Tournament Uses Sissy Grass

This was the weekend of the Masters golf tournament.

What I find most fascinating about the Masters are the close-ups of balls resting on the carpet-like fairways. The grass it’s so uniform and short it looks like artificial turf.

I am your stereotypical duffer and the courses I play on are not championship caliber. Dead patches and divots are the norm. Winter rules are in effect, meaning you can move your ball out of a lie that has been ruined because of bad grass.

Winter rules are common for northern Ontario courses because of the short playing season and the need for course owners to generate revenue before the grass is really ready. Besides, duffers like me like being able to move our ball to a better lie.

I occasionally play a championship level course. There is one in my hometown, but I seldom play there because the green fees are considerably more than the $12 for nine holes that I’m used to paying. And, while the fairways are beautifully groomed, I can’t hit off them. They’re too nice. To me, it’s like hitting off a putting green and my sub-conscious mind must be trained not to take divots off a green. So I whiff a lot.

Yup – you can take the Masters and that fancy golf course. It’s not real golfing for me. I could empathize much better if the Augusta National course was a cow pasture.

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Dick Moss, Editor,
PE Update.com

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[tags]golf,Masters,course,grass,sissy,winter rules,physical education[/tags]

Spring is a Time of Contrast in Canada

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Early Spring in Canada is a time of contrast. Here are some examples that I witnessed this weekend:

Canada geese, disappointed after their long flight from the south, circling overhead, searching for open water. But the lakes are still frozen. Later, I saw the same geese walking around on the middle of a lake, honking like crazy. It was probably Mrs. Goose telling Mr. Goose, “I TOLD you it was too early to leave Florida. But you never listen!”

A track team turned into a work party, shoveling the last of the snow off the inside lanes of the track.

Students walking around in flip-flops and T-shirts. Others wearing parkas.

A cross-country skier flying along the trails, wearing nothing but a t-shirt, shorts, sunglasses…and a toque.

Spring is good. But there are disadvantages. With the days getting longer, early morning joggers are now identifiable as they pound down the streets. As one friend put it, “I don’t like that people can see me when I’m running. Now I have to brush my hair when I get up.”

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Dick Moss, Editor,
PE Update.com

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[tags]Spring,sports,fitness,activities[/tags]

Coaches Who “Work the Refs”

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Boo hoo. My favourite teams in the NCAA basketball tournament are gone. My alma mater, Wisconsin, was hammered by my second favorite team, Cinderella squad, Davidson. Then on Sunday, Davidson was beaten by Kansas.

However, an incident in the Stanford versus Marquette game highlighted a coaching tactic that I really hate. The Stanford coach was ejected for walking onto the floor in order to continue complaining about a referee’s call. He had already been warned once about his behavior.

This took place early in the game – with three minutes left in the first half.
While assistant coaches are prepared to take over their team, this was akin to changing a ship’s rudder in the middle of a storm. His team bailed him out – barely. Stanford won on a last-second shot in overtime.

While I respect coach Trent Johnson’s sincere apology in the post-game interview, this incident brings attention to a form of coaching behavior that I truly dislike.

Many coaches, at all levels and in many sports, now feel they aren’t doing their job unless they are “working the refs.” The thinking is, if they complain enough about every questionable call, they’ll get some “make up” calls later in the game.

The result is a constant stream of complaints aimed at the officials…from the same builders of character who preach composure to their athletes.

They might indeed get an extra call here or there. But they also risk losing credibility with the officials when they really DO have a legitimate complaint.

However, the biggest drawback is the message they are sending their athletes. They tell them not to whine and sulk and complain after a bad call. Then they go ahead and do it themselves. It’s a mixed message and one that makes it difficult to develop positive behavior among young athletes.

One reason for this trend? The television attention that coaches get when they are performing their referee rants. It’s a not-so-subtle form of approval for their poor behavior.

Just let the athletes play the game.

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Dick Moss, Editor,
PE Update.com

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[tags]March Madness,NCAA, tournament,sports,sport,basketball,sports, referees[/tags]

Small Universities and March Madness

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This is one of my favorite weekends in sports…the first weekend of March Madness. There are so many games televised that I don’t have to leave my LazyBoy for three solid days. I usually get the chance to cheer for my alma mater (Go Wisconsin!) – at least for a few rounds of play. And this is the weekend for upsets, Cinderella teams and universities you’ve never heard of.

And that’s the benefit of sport for many of these smaller schools. It puts their name on a national stage for a few days. It gives them name recognition and, through the “halo effect,” provides an an impression of excellence to prospective students and donors . The subconscious thinking is, “Heck, if they’re good at one thing (basketball), they’re probably good at other things too (like academics).”

Here’s a guide to some of the small, lesser-known schools who have made it to the “big dance.” It’s organized by size of enrollment. Do you know the location of every school?

Davidson College, 1700 Students, Davidson, North Carolina
Mount St. Mary’s, 2100 students, Emmitsburg, Maryland
Sienna, 3000 students, Loudonville, New York
Butler, 4437 students total, Indianapolis, Indiana
Belmont University, 4500 students, Nashville, TN,
Drake, Des Moines, IA, 5000 students
Winthrop, 6292 total students, Rock Hill (Near Charlotte), South Carolina
Xavier, Cincinnati, OH, 6646 students.
Gonzaga, 6736 Students – Spokane Washington
Austin Peay, 9105 students, Clarksville, TN (45 minutes NW of Nashville
Vanderbilt, 11,847 students, also in Nashville,
UMBC (University of Maryland, Baltimore Country), 12,041 students, Baltimore, MD,,

Compare their enrollments with Michigan State’s 46,000 students.

The hotbed of small schools in the tournament seems to be the Nashville area, with Vanderbilt, Belmont and Austin Peay, all in or near the country-music capital.

And who is this year’s Cinderella team? It seems to be Davidson, who advanced to the Sweet Sixteen by beating Georgetown (enrollment 6500).

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Dick Moss, Editor,
PE Update.com

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[tags]March Madness,NCAA, tournament,sports,sport,basketball,sports[/tags]

Sports Injuries Often Occur Off the Field

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An event during this year’s cross-country running season reinforced the point of an article I wrote several years ago called “Injuries- Check Outside Activities.” (PE Update members can find it using the search bar).

The point of the article was, if your athletes sustain an injury – especially a chronic injury – make sure you know what their outside activities involve. And make sure you know what kind of shoes they use for casual-wear.

What reminded me of that article was one of my female runners who complained of foot pain back in the Fall. A week of non-impact training in the swimming pool didn’t help at all – the pain kept getting worse.

It wasn’t until we saw her mosey into practice one afternoon that we realized what was going on. She was wearing ballet-type slippers. Our campus is hilly with a 15-minute walk on paved streets between some classes. She was wearing the slippers because they were “comfy.”

After advising her to wear better shoes, there was still no improvement for a couple of days. We then thought to ask what she was wearing instead of the slippers. Flip flops. Not much better. She explained that they went with her nail polish (this was in late October in a northern climate). Needless to say, we advised another change in footwear.

A week after exchanging her ballet slippers and flip-flops for regular running shoes, her foot pain was gone. A miracle!!

This is a great example of an injury whose origin wasn’t sport-related. The moral is, be careful when you encounter one of your own athlete’s ailments – they may not have occurred on the playing field at all. And athletes often don’t realize how their non-sport activities can affect their injury status – as a result they may fail to mention such activities to you. You must often be very pointed in your questioning when trying to determine the cause of your athletes’ injuries.

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Dick Moss, Editor,
PE Update.com

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[tags]sports,sport,injuries,sports medicine, coach,coaching[/tags]