A Good Luck Message From A Caring Coach

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As the scholastic sport season winds down, I’d like to post this message from a coach to his athletes. Circumstances beyond his control left Colin Ward, the head track coach at Lo-Ellen Park Secondary School, unable to attend the city championships with his athletes – athletes with whom he’d been working for months.

While he couldn’t be there in person, he sent a message that encompasses practical advice with inspirational words. It also embodies the true spirit of scholastic sport.This is the message he sent before the meet.

Coach’s Send-Off
I want to say good luck to all of you as you head into the City Championships! I wish I could be there to see all of our training pay off. I want you to know, you all have the capacity to exceed yourselves, most of you have worked very hard to get to this point, and with these few tips you will be able to make the most of your experience this week!

1. Cheer for each other and watch each other! Most people need an audience, or at the very least, appreciate the words of encouragement that come from friends and team mates.

2. Support each other. Some people will have great days and simply need to be congratulated, others will have bad days, and just need a friend to sit with.

3. The little things matter! Our team usually does better when the conditions are horrible because we pay attention to details. That means……..

  • Rest the day before, and get a good sleep before and during competitions.
    •    Eat well and drink lots of water,
    •    STAY OUT OF THE SUN AND WIND
    •    Dress properly. You should have the clothes to stay warm in any weather. The engine only works when it is hot! If you get cold, you may as well throw away months of training.
    •    Cool down! Most of you know to warm-up properly, but if you don’t cool down you are slowing your recovery. A light jog for 10 -20 minutes is a good use of time after an event.

4. Focus on the positive. You might not do as well as you were hoping to, but beating yourself up over it won’t do any good. Focus instead on what went right, then think about areas for improvement. This is not always easy to do in the heat of the moment, but it is worth keeping in mind.

5. Have fun!! High School will be over before you know it. Enjoy these moments with your team and friends. Years from now it won’t matter how you did, it will just matter that you did.

And post videos and pictures for me, I’ll be following the events closely.”

This is the final blog post until September. I won’t post during the July or August vacation period because I’m not sure there’ll be anyone to read them. Have a great summer!!

Dick Moss, Editor, 
PE Update.com

dick_headshot_web8.jpg

Dick Moss, Editor,
PE Update.com

To check out the PE Update.com website, click here
Physical Education Update

[tags]physical education,track and field,coaching,coach>[/tags]

 

Downhill Skiing Video Is A Sure Adrenaline Rush

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The Winter Olympics have just been put to bed and with it the adrenaline rush you get from watching death-defying high-speed sports.

Two of my favorite events are downhill skiing and the giant slalom. That stems from the days of the Crazy Canucks, a group of Canadian downhill skiers who made Canada’s first impact into World Cup skiing in the 1970s and ’80s. During a sport psychology clinic in the 1980s, I remember watching a video of Dave Irwin. A camera was mounted on this Crazy Canuck and he was miked up so we could hear his self-talk as he plummeted down the mountain. It was exhilarating, frightening and gave me tremendous respect for these daredevil athletes. It also provided an inkling into the fear and doubt these athletes must overcome in order to perform their sport.

There’s a new video that reprises that early Irwin video. It follows legendary skier Aksel Lund Svindal of Norway, an Olympic Champion in the Super-G in Vancouver and five-time World Champion in downhill, giant slalom, and super combined. The video is taken on a downhill course, the year after he suffered a season-ending injury due to a horrendous crash.

The camera work, some of it “Go-Pro” style is incredible. The sense of speed, danger and courage, and the mental games required to conquer the fear associated with downhill skiing is communicated wonderfully. The back-view of Svindal’s knees over his very narrow skis shows how fragile are the human beings who attempt to harness the brute power of these massive mountains.

It took me a few moments after watching this four-minute video for my heart rate to recover. And I only watched it… and I don’t ski!

It’s filmed in full 1080p. I’d advice you to select that setting, go full-screen and settle in for four minutes of adrenaline rush.

As physical educator, one of your jobs is to inspire your students to take up a sport and chase goals. This video might inspire one of your charges. And it might even teach them some Norwegian!

dick_headshot_web8.jpg

Dick Moss, Editor,
PE Update.com

To check out the PE Update.com website, click here
Physical Education Update

[tags]physical education,winter sports,downhill skiing,giant slalom,Olympics,Aksel Lund Svindal,In the Blink of an Eye,Crazy Canucks,Dave Irwin,skiing videos>[/tags]

If You’ve Never Failed, You’ve Never Lived – A Video

Here’s an inspirational video you can show your students or athletes. It can be particularly powerful after your team has lost a game or championship. You can also use it with individual students who appear to have a fear of failure.

The video highlights a number of famous people who initially failed in their endeavors, then rose to become high successful.

The end-phrase: “If you’ve never failed, you’ve never lived.”

dick_headshot_web8.jpg

Dick Moss, Editor,
PE Update.com

To check out the PE Update.com website, click here
Physical Education Update

[tags]physical education,failure,success,success and failure>[/tags]

Jenny Simpson – World 1500 Meter Champion – on Dealing With Disappointment

Here’s an excellent interview for those of you who must deal with athletes who have experienced a disappointing performance…and what coach hasn’t dealt with that situation!

In fact, it’s so relevant that you might want to email a link to such athletes so they can watch it themselves.

The interview is with Jenny Barringer Simpson. Jenny, currently 26 years of age, won a surprise gold medal in the 1500 meters at the 2011 World Championships in Athletics. She is also the American record holder in the steeplechase with a time of 9:12.50.

Here’s a sample of her philosophy: “But I can tell you from past experiences, you can’t win them all, but you can be a fighter in every circumstance.”

I’m having some formatting problems, so I’ve had to put her interview at the very bottom of the page.

Also, here is footage of her World Championship win. She was not favored to win and the look of shock on her face after the race is priceless (I think the commentary is in Spanish). Her interview about disappointment did not take place after this race.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=XO9R-Ds60Jo#!

dick_headshot_web8.jpg

Dick Moss, Editor,
PE Update.com

To check out the PE Update.com website, Click Here!
To subscribe to the free Fun Stuff for PE Newsletter, Click Here!

[tags]Jenny Simpson,Jenny Barringer Simpson,track and field,1500 metres,1500 meters,World Athletics Championships 2011>[/tags]

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